Scriptedbypurpose

explicit and scripted processes within design

Neil C. Katz

http://www.aecbytes.com/viewpoint/2007/issue_32.html

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Several examples of frit patterns created using lisp for use in glazing design. (Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP)

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Another example showing a more complex frit pattern. (Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP)

Neil Katz is an architect, and has been with SOM – Skidmore Owings & Merrill LLP – for over twenty years. He has been involved in the “computational design” aspects of many projects, often suggesting solutions to geometrically complex issues that arise in the design process, and typically creating computational tools to address these.

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Example of a cylindrical diagrid on which a building’s structure could be based. (Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP)

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Other variations of a cylindrical diagrid generated using lisp. (Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP)

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SOM’s Lotte Tower project in Seoul, Korea, on which many parametric modeling processes have been used. (Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP)

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The basic structure of the Lotte Tower project, derived using parametric modeling in AutoCAD. Both the 3D model and the unfolded model are shown. (Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP)

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Examples of solar incidence angle analysis for the Lotte Tower project. The top image shows analysis results for mornings during spring, while the lower image shows the analysis for afternoons during autumn. (Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP)

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The complete set of solar incidence angle analysis for the same project, allowing solar penetration to be studied for the entire year. (Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP)

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The solar incidence angle analysis summary image for the Lotte Tower project. (Courtesy of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP)

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